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Industrial Generator

Industrial
Generator
Portable




Industrial Generator Portable

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Industrial
Standby
Single-Phase
21 To 50kW


Industrial Standby Single-Phase 21 To 50kW

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Industrial
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Three-Phase
21 To 50kW


Industrial Standby Three-Phase 21 To 50kW

208-Volts
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Standby
Generator
Single-Phase
51 To 100kW


Standby Generator Single-Phase 51 To 100kW

Diesel
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Standby
Generator
Three-Phase
51 To 100kW



Standby Generator Three-Phase 51 To 100kW

208-Volts
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Industrial
Standby
Single-Phase
Over 100kW


Industrial Standby Single-Phase Over 100kW

Diesel
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Industrial
Standby
Three-Phase
Over 100kW



Industrial Standby Three-Phase Over 100kW

208-Volts
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Industrial
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Industrial Generator Alternative Styles

Small Standby
Compact-Diesel
Towable-Diesel


Industrial Generator

Industrial GENERATOR diesel UNITS and the CROSS-HEAD bearing.

The year was 1893 - Rudolf Diesel's essay, 'Theory and Construction of a Rational Heat-engine to Replace the Steam Engine and Combustion Engines Known Today' was first published - at the time, it presumably caused only a mild stir; well Diesel would go on to create plenty of noise (figuratively and literally) a few years later when he debuted his first compression-ignition motor
The designs of the earliest large diesel motors were based upon the towering industrial steam engines of the late 1800s and early 1900s. Because rotational stresses inside those engine were so extreme, the piston and crankshaft could only be linked with a cross head bearing (the cross-head works like this: it is installed between the piston head and crankshaft and performs the same function as a typical connecting rod would in a car engine, the only difference that it absorbs virtually all of the piston's rotational force; as the piston travels up and down in the cylinder that utilizes a cross head bearing, it transfers its energy to the cross head rather than to the crankshaft - the cross head bearing itself then rotates the crankshaft; piston and crankshaft aren't directly connected as they would be in an automobile motor).1897 - Adolphus Busch, co-founder of the major American brewer, Anheuser-Busch, journeyed to Cologne to acquire licensing rights for Rudolf Diesel's revolutionary engine; Busch would bring this early diesel technology to US and Canadian markets Some early diesels made use of what's known as a double-acting cylinder (in which, as the piston travels back and forth or up and down inside the cylinder, combustion processes are created on both its sides). The double action configuration was a winner for the diesel engine in terms of its raw power production and (especially) in its operational efficiency, however it failed in reliability (the seals between piston rod and combustion chamber frequently gave way). While, at the time, cross heads lost favor, this design is still utilized today in oversized marine diesels - as a way to reduce cylinder wear (also provides favorable maintenance dynamics at the engine's top end by allowing pistons to be easily accessed and far more easily removed than they would be in a single action motor).

1898 - Russian oil company, Branobel, obtained rights to adapt Rudolf Diesel's engine for marine applications - this process was finally completed in 1902, however the motor Branobel technicians developed was only utilized for auxiliary purposes

Car and TRUCK diesels TEND to be four-STROKE units; large MARINE and RAILROAD applications typically rely on TWO-stroke power.

1899 - Krupp and Sulzer obtained license to mass produce the diesel motor; it abruptly turned both these small companies into manufacturing giants; known today as Wärtsilä-Sulzer, the second of the two is responsible for the world's largest engine - a 113,000-horsepower diesel behemoth that stands four stories plus high and creates over 84000 kilowatts of output in its marine role!
Both the diesel and gasoline engine makes use of the two-stroke and four-stroke configuration. Rudolf Diesel's original prototype was a four-stroke in its design, and, in most of today's road-driven vehicles, the four stroke motor is preferred, partly for its favorable operational smoothness, even more for its cleaner output (as is true with gasoline-burning two-stroke engines, two-stroke diesels are unapologetic polluters). On the other hand, most of the massive diesels used in marine and rail applications continue to boast the two-stroke configuration.1903 - the first purely diesel-powered ships appeared; these undersized early marine applications were limited in travel to rivers and canals The two-stroke provides superior output for its size - obviously significant in these huge applications - and, just as important considering the amounts of fuel they consume, it delivers better overall fuel economy than the four-stroke. It should be no surprise to anyone, therefore, that the largest and highest-horsepower motors in existence are two-stroke diesels. The two-stroke diesel normally utilizes a mechanically-driven supercharger to fill (or charge) the engine cylinders prior to compression (charging occurs when the piston is near but not quite at bottom dead center or BDC). In this respect, a two-stroke diesel differs from its gasoline-consuming cousin. In a two-stroke gasoline engine, the crankcase actually participates in the combustion process, acting as a reservoir for the fuel/air mixture before it is transferred to the combustion chamber. Two and four-stroke diesels are similar in that fuel is injected into the cylinder after compression has begun.

1904 - the first diesel-powered submarine was launched by the French



So what's the TROUBLE with TODAY'S piston RINGS?


The exhaust cycle of a two-stroke diesel occurs when the piston is near BDC (bottom dead center). At this juncture, as is true in a two-stroke gasoline equivalent, exhaust ports or valves are exposed by the moving piston and mildly pressurized byproducts of combustion are released through the tailpipe. Helping to flush the cylinder is air for compression - arriving via a passageway from what is usually called the "air box" (filled by the engine's rotating supercharger). The supercharger ensures that contents of this air box are pressurized to spur its movement into the combustion chamber. Though they differ somewhat in execution, in their strategies the strokes of the two-cycle diesel and the two-cycle gasoline engine are identical. As the piston rises again in the cylinder of either engine, exhaust ports (and intake ports) are shut off (covered by the piston) and the combustion chamber is effectively prepared for compression. It was discovered as far back as thirty years ago that the two-stroke engine's power could be noticeably enhanced with an enlarged exhaust port.1905 - in an effort to ramp up what was considered sluggish performance by early diesel engines, the first diesel-compatible turbo/intercooler packages and supercharger were introduced Engineers at Yamaha and other entities would discover that piston ring technology (the limitations of this technology are just as relevant today) effectively capped the width of the exhaust port in any consumer application. The problem? That if the port was too gaping, it allowed the piston rings to slide into it each time the piston traveled up or down inside the cylinder - engendering excessive wear on the cylinder, and in particular on the rings. Though circumscribed in their feasibility, these oversized exhaust ports are not completely out of use. They continue to be employed in racing applications (generator applications? No!) where ring replacement (and internal engine repairs in general) are routine.

1908 - engineer/inventor, Prosper L'Orange, while working for preeminent diesel-engine maker, Deutz, designed a precision injector pump with a needle-sized nozzle - L'Orange would shortly quit Deutz in favor of rival manufacturer, Benz - for whom he designed the first prechamber (used in conjunction with a hemispherical or half-circle shaped combustion chamber)

The inline-six is POPULAR in diesel GENERATOR applications while LIQUID-cooled gas-BURNING models prefer the INLINE-four or the V8.

1909 - the prechamber/hemispherical combustion chamber combination created by Prosper L'Orange and Benz allowed for the development of physically-smaller higher-rpm diesel powerplants that could be started without assistance of a compressor - these improvements opened the door to diesel-engine use in road-driven vehicles (delivery trucks and haulers for instance)
You may have noticed that the number of cylinders in a multi-cylinder engine tends to be even rather than odd - two cylinders, four cylinders, six or eight cylinders, ten cylinders. This is because an even number of pistons provides a natural means of balancing the crankshaft for vibration control during operation. Single-cylinder, three-cylinder, and five-cylinder engines make more liberal use of counterweights to accomplish the same purpose. With respect to diesel standby generators, the powerplant manufacturers prefer is often an inline four or an inline six-cylinder unit.1912 - the first ocean-going vessel utilizing a diesel engine for its primary power, and the first diesel-run locomotive, were manufactured Standby gas-burning generators can utilize anything from a two-cylinder (in an air-cooled machine) to a V10 (in a liquid-cooled one. Eight-cylinder V-configured engines are common in liquid-cooled standby models above 50 or 60 kilowatts. Below 50 kilowatts, the inline 4-cylinder motor is used for motivation more often than the inline six. Attempts to produce greater power at lower engine weights have resulted in some unique designs - for instance, an experimental engine that found itself a home in aviation applications utilized a single cylinder and two opposed pistons. Taking turns with the combustion chamber (located in the middle between the two piston heads), each piston rotated its own crankshaft. Another motor with aviation prowess made use of six pistons, three cylinders, and one crankshaft per cylinder.





For ULTIMATE efficiency, there is NOTHING like the ultra-slow SPEED diesel.
1913 - Rudolf Diesel vanished while crossing the English Channel on the ship, SS Dresden - there is some dispute as to whether he committed suicide (turned out that, once a very wealthy man, he was virtually broke - and apparently ashamed of it - at the time of his death) or was murdered by jealous rivals; his decomposed body (identified only by the items carried in its pockets) was discovered near Norway 10 days later

The slow-speed diesels (rpm of under 300) used in marine and other large applications boast exceptional (unmatched even) efficiency in terms of the power developed per quantity of fuel consumed (as much as a 50% thermal efficiency compared with 30 to 32% for a high-speed diesel and under 20% thermal efficiency for any gas-burning engine - natural gas and propane-burners included). While this level of efficiency is intriguing, these slow-speed models weigh too much and offer performance too sluggish for most applications. The fact that they are also intense polluters makes these slow-speed (primarily 2-stroke) diesel motors impractical for road vehicles which, in most areas of the world, must now meet stringent emissions standards.1919 - inventor Prosper L'Orange patented a new type of prechamber and needle-sized injector nozzle In 1930, diesel-engine maker, Sulzer, began exploring the viability of high-efficiency gas turbine motors. These units featured high-pressure two-stroke powerplants and compressor (rather than engine) driven turbines. Crankshafts were eliminated in favor of simple linkage. The two-stroke motor influenced compressor pistons which, in turn, generated the power required for turbine operation. Like slow-speed diesels, these motors were extraordinarily efficient but overwhelming in their weight and size - however (as is true of many modern inverter generators), they could be operated in concert for increased total output. This permitted them to (jointly) power larger turbines than their individual capacities would allow.

1921 - L'Orange struck again - this time producing an injector pump with changing outputs based on rpm and the engine's load requirements


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T-Rex Generators distributes products from many different standby and portable generator manufacturers at substantially discounted prices. These represented companies include: Asco automatic transfer switches, Briggs & Stratton generators, Winco generators, Generac Generators, GenTran transfer switches, Reliance Controls Transfer Switches, and Zenith automatic transfer switches. T-Rex also carries Honda powered generators which have the same time-tested Honda engines as the substantially more expensive Honda generator brand units.